HoC Health Committee ( Social Care ) – 26th November

Parliament TV Wilson Room Meeting started at 10am Social Care Witnesses Age Concern and Help the Aged, Counsel and Care, and Alzheimer’s Society Mencap, Mind, Multiple Sclerosis Society, and Carers UK Carer Watch submitted our response to the Green Paper to this committee and received the following reply….. Dear Ms Thompson Thank you for the email you sent to me and Sandra Gidley about the Health Committee’s inquiry into Social Care. Our inquiry sessions are fairly tightly scripted and so the best thing I can do is send your letter and the attachment to the Clerk to the Committee for it to be included with the evidence we have received for this inquiry. Regards, Dr Richard Taylor...

Peter Beresford- Submitted on behalf of Shaping Our Lives

National Consultation With Service Users on the Future of Social Care Funding October 2009 Organised by Brunel University and Shaping Our Lives Supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation Peter Beresford Submitted on behalf of Shaping Our Lives National Consultation With Service Users on the Future of Social Care Funding October 2009 Summary of Findings · Service users share the widely predicted view that the need for social care will increase significantly, but see this as complex and are critical of the way it tends to be framed in terms of a problem and burden. · Most see the three funding options offered in the Green Paper, the ‘partnership’, ‘insurance’ and ‘comprehensive’ options, as inadequate and not offering everyone the support they might need to live their lives fully and equally. · There was unanimous opposition to the proposal to divert money currently spent on welfare benefits like Attendance Allowance (AA) and Disability Living Allowance (DLA) to help fund proposed new arrangements for funding social care. This was seen as a backward step, taking money under the control of disabled people which helped meet the costs of disability. · The great majority of people consulted thought that social care support should be available free and as an entitlement along the lines of NHS founding principles. The funding options offered in the Green Paper were not seen to make this possible. Service users’ awareness of the complex issues of cost and what would be covered led them to call for a broader discussion on this subject. · With only one exception all service users in the consultation thought it was important...

Disabled Labour MP heads campaign against Government

A disabled Labour MP is leading a campaign against Government attempts to scrap benefits for needy pensioners. Anne Begg, who is confined to a wheelchair, has written to ministers urging them to save the attendance allowance, payments used by 1.6 million over-65s to buy themselves better social care. She is joined by other senior Labour backbenchers, such as the chairman of the influential all-party Commons disability group, who are also concerned that the benefit could be axed as part of a shake-up of social care. Read in full here Daily...

South Tyneside Central Organisation on Disabilities

Observations of South Tyneside Central Organisation on Disabilities on the document ‘Building Britain’s Future: Shaping of Future Care Together’ Question 1 says that Chapter 3 of the document talked about six things which can be expected from a National Care Service and asks if anything has been missed. This organisation agrees with the six things listed on page 15 of the easy to read copy of the document, but considers that two further things should be added. Number 7 would be Advocacy for people with disabilities and Number 8 would be Fairness for Carers. With regard to the items listed on page 15 and the two we have added, our comments are as follows: Prevention Services. This organisation believes strongly in the importance of prevention services. If people who have needs, even if those needs are only low or moderate, the sooner those needs are attended to the better and hopefully this may result in those needs either not becoming substantial or critical or them not becoming substantial or critical for a long time. This could actually save money in the long term. Historically, services have been provided to people who have low, moderate, substantial or critical needs, and according to their own individual needs. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) and Attendance Allowance (AA) benefits have been awarded to individuals according to their personal circumstances, and these benefits have allowed the individual choice and control over their lives. Recently in South Tyneside individuals who have been assessed for care needs only receive help and support if they have substantial or critical needs. If DLA and AA benefits cease to be...